twpcanTWP 100 Stain Reviews and Ratings for Consumers who have used the stain.

 

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Total Wood Preservative (TWP) 100 Series  Wood and Decking Stain protects and prolongs all exterior woods, decks, and fences. TWP Wood Deck Stains and Sealers is a distinctive mixture of chemicals blended together to form a professional strength formula that preserves exterior wood surfaces in numerous ways.

TWP 100 Wood Deck Stain stops moisture absorption that can cause board warping, splitting, and cracking. It also protects against freeze damage in colder climates.

 

 

TWP is a registered trademark of Amteco Inc.

 

Please write a review of your experience with TWP 1500 Stain or ask a question in the comment area below.

 

Please Include:

  • Ease of Application for TWP 100 on your wood or decking
  • Overall Appearance of the TWP 100 Series when stained
  • Durability of the TWP 100 after 2 years. Color retention and wear/tear
  • Color Choice

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Comments   

RE: TWP 100 Stain Reviews
Quoting Mary mugglebee:
Would like your comment on using your product on our new carriage cedar garage doors.... Should I wait for wood to weather? How should I apply it?
Any information will be helpful. Thanks!
Mary

Please read this:
www.twpstainhelp.com/.../

Use a stain pad after eating and proper prep.
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New cedar garage doors/stain
Would like your comment on using your product on our new carriage cedar garage doors.... Should I wait for wood to weather? How should I apply it?
Any information will be helpful. Thanks!
Mary
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RE: TWP 100 Stain Reviews
Quoting Bill Miller:
-Stain stirring was not even
-Etc.

I guess "Etc." must be the culprit as we've both pretty much ruled out uneven stain stirring. I can tell you that any dissimilarity in the age of the wood, the sanding procedure, and stain application can also be ruled out as the entire deck was built of the same wood at the same time and that the pretreatment and application stages were handled identically.

I'll not strip the deck and start over. I'll let it season over the winter per your instructions and re-coat in the spring. Getting expensive....

Most likely you will get it even in the Spring.
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RE: TWP 100 Stain Reviews
-Stain stirring was not even
-Etc.

I guess "Etc." must be the culprit as we've both pretty much ruled out uneven stain stirring. I can tell you that any dissimilarity in the age of the wood, the sanding procedure, and stain application can also be ruled out as the entire deck was built of the same wood at the same time and that the pretreatment and application stages were handled identically.

I'll not strip the deck and start over. I'll let it season over the winter per your instructions and re-coat in the spring. Getting expensive....
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RE: TWP 100 Stain Reviews
Quoting Bill Miller:
I used a 5 gallon stirring attachment on an electric drill for 15-20 minutes to mix my stain before applying it to the sanded portion of my deck. The Rustic stain went on dark and dried to a light brown as expected. After sanding the another section, I again mixed the stain as before and applied it, but the stain went on dark and stayed dark. I'm thinking the pigment had settled, didn't get mixed well enough even with my aggressive stirring for the first application, and was mixed to a greater degree before the second application since by that time the pail was half empty. As a result, I have a two tone deck and am more than a little perturbed about how the pigment remained on the bottom of the pail while I thought my electric whirlpool was doing the job. Now what?

There could be many reasons for this:
-Sanded smoother in first area would result in a lighter color
-Was the age of the wood different in the two sections?
-Application was different
-Stain stirring was not even
-Etc.

I doubt it was the stirring as it seems you did a good job with this. I am guessing the sanding as sanding in our opinion creates more problems then good. At this point there is not much you can do except strip and start over. Other option is to let it season and apply another coat in Spring to all wood to try an even it out.

By the way, Rustic is not a light brown color. It is a reddish brown color. I am thinking the second darker color you have is the more "correct" color.
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RE: TWP 100 Stain Reviews
I used a 5 gallon stirring attachment on an electric drill for 15-20 minutes to mix my stain before applying it to the sanded portion of my deck. The Rustic stain went on dark and dried to a light brown as expected. After sanding the another section, I again mixed the stain as before and applied it, but the stain went on dark and stayed dark. I'm thinking the pigment had settled, didn't get mixed well enough even with my aggressive stirring for the first application, and was mixed to a greater degree before the second application since by that time the pail was half empty. As a result, I have a two tone deck and am more than a little perturbed about how the pigment remained on the bottom of the pail while I thought my electric whirlpool was doing the job. Now what?
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RE: TWP 100 Stain Reviews
Ali, TWP is a penetrating non-filming stain.
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RE: TWP 100 Stain Reviews
we have a whole log home and need a finish that will allow the logs to breath. Does TWP allow that or does it completely prevent moisture from wicking out?
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