TWP Stain Reviews, Articles, How-To Tips

Best Way to Apply TWP 100 and 1500 Series Wood Decking Stains

It is best to first measure the wood surface of your staining project. Do not forget to include steps, railings and spindles if you are staining a deck and double the footage of a fence if staining both sides. On average TWP covers approximately 150-300 sq. ft. per gallon. The newer the wood the less stain it will take. Older wood is more porous and will absorb more stain.

Prior to applying any TWP stain be sure the surface is free of dirt, grime, mildew or any old coatings. Use a wood cleaner when no old failed coatings are present. If an old coating is to be removed use a wood stain stripper instead. Allow the wood to dry for 48 hours after cleaning.

Rain Before or After TWP – Dry and Curing Time of TWP

Protecting your exterior wood surfaces with TWP (Total Wood Preservative) is a project that most homeowners can complete themselves. TWP will preserve the wood’s natural beauty and shield it from the harsh elements. The user-friendly formula is easy to apply and maintain but care should be taken when considering when to apply the stain. Weather can be a tricky and create problems. Most of all rain should be avoided at all costs.

A perfect forecast for staining would be 1-2 days with no chance of precipitation. Prior to staining, the wood should air dry for 24-48 hours after it has been cleaned. If it rains within that window soaking the wood again then wait an addition 1-2 days before staining. It is important the wood is dry before staining otherwise moisture could be trapped under the stain creating an environment for mold and mildew.

Why Wait 4-12 Months for New Wood To Season Before Staining with TWP

It is no secret that new wood needs to be stained and protected from the elements in order to look good and last a long time. Whether it is a new deck, fence, siding, shakes, a gazebo or maybe a pergola it will need to “season” before it can be stained with TWP or any type of stain. Seasoning is the process of allowing new wood to dry. New wood is very high in moisture and can take anywhere from 4-12 months to dry out.

Why wait 4-12 months for new wood to season? If you do not wait and you decide to stain new wood too soon it can cause many problems down the road. Essentially what is happening when a stain is applied too soon is moisture is being locked in the wood. This trapped moisture can cause extensive mold and mildew problems for the life of the wood. This can quickly progress to wood rot and decay. In a worse case scenario, the wood can deteriorate quickly due to moisture being present and lose its structural integrity. Staining prior to proper seasoning can mean premature costly repairs and replacements.